Science, Engineering & Technology

Co Superintendent - Lee Sherry, Madison
Co Superintendent - Amy Timmerman, Holt
Co Superintendent - Julie Kreikemeier, Colfax


Rules

  1. The name and county of each exhibitor should appear separately on the back of each board, poster or article and on the front cover of the notebooks so owner of the exhibit may be identified if the entry tag is separated from the exhibit.
  2. Each individual is limited to one exhibit per class. All static exhibits must have received a purple ribbon at the county fair to advance to the State Fair.
  3. Several classes require a display board which should be a height of 24 inches and not to exceed 1/4-inch thickness. A height of 24 7/8 inches is acceptable to allow for the saw kerf (width) if two 24 inch boards are cut from one end of a 4 foot by 8-foot sheet of plywood. Nothing should be mounted within 3/4 inch of the top or bottom of the board. (Example: Woodworking & Electricity.)
  4. Fabricated board such as plywood, composition board, or particle-type lumber may be used for demonstration displays.
  5. Demonstration boards should be sanded and finished to improve their appearance. The finish on a demonstration board will be judged as a woodworking exhibit.
  6. Demonstration boards should include an overall title for the display, plus other necessary labeling.
  7.  Reports should be written using the scientific method whenever possible (Background, the Question or hypothesis, what you plan to do and what you did, Method used and observations, Results: what you learned.  All reports should be computer generated and enclosed in a clear plastic cover. The reports should be attached securely to the display. 
  8. Reports should be written using the scientific method whenever possible (Background, the Question or hypothesis, what you plan to do and what you did, Method used and observations. Results: What you learned. All reports should be computer generated and enclosed in a clear, plastic cover. The reports should be attached securely to the display.
  9. Premier 4-H Science Award is available in this area. Please see General Rules for more details.

Classes

DIVISION 850 - AEROSPACE

Rockets must be supported substantially to protect the rocket from breakage. Rockets are to be mounted on a base that has dimensions equal or less than 12" x 12" and the base should be 3/4" thick. No metal bases. If the rocket fins extend beyond the edges of the required base (12” x 12”), then construct a base that is large enough to protect the fins. The base size is dictated by the size of the rocket fins. The rockets must be mounted vertically. Please do not attach sideboards or backdrops to the displays. In addition, a used engine or length of dowel pin is to be glued and/or screwed into the board and extended up into the rockets engine mount to give added stability. Rockets must be equipped as prepared for launching, with wadding and parachute or other recovery system. Rockets entered with live engines, wrong base size or sideboards will be disqualified. A report, protected in a clear plastic cover, must include: 1) rocket specification, 2) a flight record for each launching (weather, distance, flight height), 3) number of launchings, 4) flight pictures 5) statistics, 6) objectives learned and 7) conclusions. The flight record should describe engine used, what the rocket did in flight and recovery success. Points will not be deducted for launching, flight or recovery failures described. This includes any damage that may show on the rocket. Complete factory assembled rockets will not be accepted at the State Fair. Judging is based upon display appearance, rocket appearance, workmanship, design or capabilities for flight, number of times launched and report. Three launches are required to earn the 9 launch points given on the score sheets. Counties are allowed a maximum of eight entries for all rocketry. For scoring for the State Fair, only actual launches count, misfires will not count towards one of the required three launches.

For self-designed rockets only, please include digital recorded copy of one flight. In the documentation please include a description of stability testing before the rocket was flown.

4-H Rocket project levels are not intended to correspond to National Association of Rocketry model rocket difficulty ratings or levels.

LIFT OFF – UNIT 2

  • Class H850001. Rocket (SF92) - Any Skill Level 2 Rocket with wooden fins painted by hand or air brush.
  • Class H850002. Display (SF93) - Display exemplifying one of the principles learned in the Lift Off project. Examples include: display of rocket parts and purpose, interview of someone in the aerospace field, or kite terminology. Display can be any size up to 28” by 22”.
  • Class H850003 Rocket (SF92) - Any Skill Level 2 Rocket with wooden fins painted using commercial application example commercial spray paint.

REACHING NEW HEIGHTS - UNIT 3

  • Class H850004. Rocket (SF92) - Any Skill Level 3 Rocket with wooden fins painted by hand or air brush.
  • Class H850005. Display (SF93) - Display exemplifying one of the principles learned in the Reaching New Heights Project. Examples include: airplane instrumentation, kite flying, or radio-controlled planes. Display can be any size up to 28" by 22".
  • Class H850006. Rocket (SF92) - Any Skill Level 3 Rocket with wooden fins painted using commercial application example commercial spray paint.

PILOT IN COMMAND - UNIT 4

  • Class H850007. Rocket (SF92) - Any Skill Level 4 Rocket with wooden fins or any self-designed rocket.
  • Class H850008. Display (SF93) - Display exemplifying one of the principles learned in the Pilot in Command Project. Examples include: flying lessons, or careers in aerospace. Display can be any size up to 28" by 22".

CAREERS

  • Class H850020. Careers Interview (SF239) – Interview someone who is working in the field of aerospace and research that career. Interviews can either be written or in a multimedia format (CD/DVD). Written interviews should be in a notebook. Written reports should be 3 to 5 pages, double spaced, 12-point font, and 1” margins. Multimedia reports should be between 3 to 5 minutes in length.

DIVISION 860 - COMPUTERS

COMPUTER MYSTERIES – UNIT 2

  • Class H860001. Computer Application (SF278) – 4-H exhibitor should use computer application to create a graphic notebook utilizing computer technology. 4-H’er may create any of the following: greeting card (5 different cards should as a birthday, wedding, anniversary, sympathy get well or other); a business card (3 cards for 3 different individuals and businesses); menu (minimum of 2 pages including short description of foods and pricing); book layout (I-book); promotional flyer (3 flyers promoting 3 different events); newsletter (minimum 2 pages); or other: examples such as precision farming or family business logo etc. This exhibit consists of a notebook (8.5x11 inches) which should include a (1) a detailed report describing: (a) the task to be completed, (b) the computer application software required to complete the task, (c) specific features of the computer application software necessary for completing the task (2) print out of your project. Project may be in color or black and white.
  • Class H860002. Produce a Computer Slideshow Presentation (SF277) – Using presentation software. All slide shows for state fair should be emailed to Amy Timmerman atimmerman2@unl.edu before August 15.  Files must be saved in a PC compatible format with county name and last name of participant before emailing.  All county fair projects with a printout should be saved on a CD Rom to be submitted for county fair.  Slideshow should include a minimum of 10 slides and no more than 25. Incorporate appropriate slide layouts, graphics, animations and audio (music or voice and transition sounds do not count). Each slide should include notes for a presenter. All slideshows must be up loaded.

COMPUTER MYSTERIES – UNIT 3

  • Class H860004. Produce an Audio/Video Computer Presentation (SF276) – Using presentation software a 4-H exhibitor designs a multimedia computer presentation on one topic related to youth. The presentation should be at least 2 minutes in length and no more than 5 minutes in length, appropriate graphics, sound and either a video clip, animation or voice over and/or original video clip. The presentation must be able to be played and viewed on a PC using Windows Media Player, Real Player, iTunes or QuickTime Player.
  • Class H860005. How to STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) Presentation (SF276) – Youth design a fully automated 2 to 5 minute 4-H “how to” video. Submissions should incorporate a picture or video of the 4-Her, as well as their name (first name only), age (as of January 1 of the current year), years in 4-H, and their personal interests or hobbies. Videos should be designed for web viewing. Any of the following formats will be accepted: .mpeg, .rm, .wmv, .mp4, .ov, .ppt, or .avi. 
  • Class H860006. Create a Web Site/Blog or App (SF275) – Design a simple Web site/ blog or app for providing information about a topic related to youth using either software programs such as an HTML editor like Microsoft’s FrontPage or Macromedia’s Dreamweaver, and image editor like IrfanView or GIMP OR online using a WIKI such as Google Sites.  If the Web site, Blog, or App isn't live include all files comprising the Web site, Blog or App should be submitted on a CD-ROM in a plastic case along with the explanation of why the site was created.  If developed using a WIKI or other online tool include a link to the website in the explanation of why the site was created.
  • Class H860007. 3D PRINTING Unique Items: 3D printing uses plastic or other materials to build a 3 dimensional object from a digital design. Youth may use original designs or someone else’s they have re-designed in a unique way. Exhibits will be judged based on the complexity of the design and shape. 3D UNIQUE OBJECT: 3D objects printed for their own sake. May be an art design, tool, or other object. 3D printing will include a notebook with the following:
    1. Software used to create 3D design.
    2. Design or, if using a re-design, the original design and the youth’s design with changes.
    3. Orientation on how the object was printed.  
  • Class H860008. 3D Printing Prototypes: 3D printing uses plastic or other materials to build a 3 dimensional object from a digital design. Youth may use original designs or someone else’s they have re-designed in a unique way. Exhibits will be judged based on the complexity of the design and shape. 3D objects printed as part of the design process for robot or other engineering project or cookie cutter, be creative. Must include statement of what design question the prototype was supposed to answer and what was learned from the prototype. 3D printing will include a notebook with the following:
    1. Software used to create 3D design.
    2. Design or, if using a re-design, the original design and the youth’s design with changes.
    3. Orientation on how the object was printed.

DIVISION 870 - ELECTRICITY

ELECTRICITY- WIRED FOR POWER – UNIT 3

  • Class H870001. Electrical Tool/Supply Kit (SF224) - Create an electrical supply kit to be used for basic electrical repair around the house. Include a brief description of each item and its use. Container should be appropriate to hold items.
  • Class H870002. Lighting Comparison (SF225) - Display studying the efficiency of various lighting (incandescent, fluorescent, halogen, Light Emitting Diodes, etc.). Exhibit could be a poster display, or an actual item.
  • Class H870003. Electrical Display/Item (SF226) - Show an application of one of the concepts learned in the Wired for Power project. Examples include: re-wiring or building a lamp, re-wiring or making a heavy duty extension cord or developing an electrical diagram of a house. Exhibit could be a poster display, or an actual item
  • Class H870004. Poster (SF227) - Poster should exemplify one of the lessons learned in the Wired for Power Project. Posters can be any size up to 28” by 22”.

ELECTRONICS – UNIT 4

  • Class H870005. Electrical/Electronic Part Identification (SF228) - Display different parts used for electrical/electronic work. Exhibit should show the part (either picture or actual item) and give a brief description, including symbol of each part and its function. Display should include a minimum of 10 different parts.
  • Class H870006. Electronic Display (SF229) - Show an application of one of the concepts learned in the Electronics project. Examples include: components of an electronic device (refer to p. 35 of the Electronic manual).
  • Class H870007. Electronic Project (SF230) - Exhibit an electronic item designed by the 4-Her or form a manufactured kit that shows the electronic expertise of the 4-H’er. Examples include: a radio, a computer, or a volt meter.
  • Class H870008. Poster (SF231) - Poster should exemplify one of the lessons learned in the Entering Electronics Project. Posters can be any size up to 28” by 22”.

CAREERS

  • Class H870010. Careers Interview (SF239) – Interview someone who is working in the field of electricity and research that career. Interviews can either be written or in a multimedia format (CD/DVD). Written interviews should be in a notebook. Written reports should be 3 to 5 pages, double spaced, 12-point font, and 1” margins. Multimedia reports should be between 3 to 5 minutes in length.

DIVISION 861 - ROBOTICS

Youth enrolled in Virtual Robotics, Junk Drawer Robotics (Levels 1, 2, or 3), Robotics Platforms or GEAR TECH 21 may exhibit in any class within this division.

 Team Entries:  To qualify for entry at the Nebraska State Fair team materials entered in robotics classes that are clearly the work of a team instead of an individual must have at least 50% of all team members enrolled in 4-H.  Additionally, all enrolled 4-H members on the team should complete and attach an entry tag to the materials.  A supplemental page documenting the individual contributions to the project should be included.  The entry will be judged as a team, with all team members receiving the same ribbon placing.

 Creating a video of your robot in action would be helpful for the judges but is not mandatory present as a CD Rom with your robot entry

  • Class H861001.   Robotics Poster (SF236) -  Create a poster (14” X 22”) communicating a robotics theme such as “Robot or Not”, “Pseudocode”, “Real World Robots”, “Careers in Robots” or “Autonomous Robotics”, “Precision Agriculture” or a robotic topic of interest to the 4-H’er.
  • Class H861002.Robotics Notebook (SF237) – Explore a robotics topic in-depth and present your findings in a notebook.  Documentation should include any designs, research, notes, pseudocode, data tables or other evidence of the 4-H’ers learning experience.  The notebook should contain at least three pages. Topics could include a programming challenge, a programming skill, calibration, sensor exploration, or any of the topics suggested in Class 1.
  • Class H861003.  Robotics Video (SF238) – This class should be displayed in a notebook. The notebook should include a video clip on a CD/DVD that demonstrates the robot performing the programmed function. Include your pseudo code and screenshots of the actual code with a written description of the icon/command functions. All videos for state fair should be emailed to Amy Timmerman  atimmerman2@unl.edu before August 15. Files must be saved in a PC compatible format with county name and last name of participant before emailing. 
  • Class H861004.  Robotics /Careers Interview (SF239) – Interview someone who is working in the field of robotics and research the career in robotics. Interviews can either be written or in a multimedia format (CD/DVD). Written interviews should be in a notebook. Written reports should be 3 to 5 pages, double spaced, 12-point font, and 1” margins. Multimedia reports should be between 3 to 5 minutes in length.
  • Class H861005.  Robotics Sensor Notebook (SF241) – Write pseudo code which includes at least one sensor activity.  Include the code written and explain the code function.  
  • Class H861006.  Build a Robot (may use kit) (SF243) – Include a robot and notebook including the pseudocodes for at least one program you have written for the robot, the robots purpose, and any challenges or changes you would make in the robot design or programming. If robot is more than 15” inches wide and 20” inches tall they may not be displayed in locked cases. We recommend that you submit the project under class H861003 – Robotics Video.
  • Class H861007.  Kit Labeled Robot (cannot be programmed.) (SF243) – This class is intended for explorations of robotic components such as arms or vehicles OR educational kits marketed as robots that do not have the ability to be programmed to “sense, plan and act.” The exhibit should include a project the youth has constructed, a description of what it does and an explanation of how it is similar to and different from a robot.  If robot is more than 15” inches wide and 20” inches tall they may not be displayed in locked cases. We recommend that you submit the project under class H861003 – Robotics Video.

DIVISION 880 - GEOSPATIAL

Youth enrolled in Geospatial or GEAR TECH 21 may exhibit in any class within this division.

  • Class H880001 Poster (SF299) - Create a poster (not to exceed14” x 22”) communicating a GPS theme such as How GPS or GIS works, Careers that use GPS or GIS, How to use GPS, What is GIS, GPS or GIS in Agriculture, Precision Agriculture, or a geospatial topic of interest.
  • Class H880002. 4-H Favorite Places or Historical Site Poster (SF272) – The 4-H exhibitor identifies a favorite place or historical site (including grave sites) in Nebraska. Exhibit should include latitude and longitude, digital picture, and local area map. Poster size should not exceed 14” X 22”.
  • Class H880003 GPS Notebook (SF300) - Keep a log of at least 5 places visited using a GPS enabled device. At least one site should be from a community other than where you live. For each site, record the latitude, longitude and elevation. Also include a description of the site, a paragraph explaining what was interesting about the site or finding it. Photos of each site and/or cache are optional but encouraged.
  • Class H880004. Geocache (SF301) - Assemble a themed geocache. Each geocache should be a water-tight container. It should include a log book and pencil for finders to log their visits and may include small trinket, geocoins, etc. for the finders to trade. Documentation should include a title, teaser description and the geographic coordinates of intended placement. Register the site at geocaching.com, include a print-out of its registry. The entry may include a photograph of the cache in its intended hiding place.
  • Class H880005. Agriculture Precision Mapping (SF302) – 4-Hers will assemble a notebook that will include a minimum of 2 digital copies of various data layers that can be used in precision agriculture to identify spatial patterns and/or correlations (printed copies of websites were applications can be purchased is acceptable) A report of how the analysis of the various data will be used to make a management decision.
  • Class H880007 4-H History Map Preserve 4-H History: Nominate a Point of Interest for the 4-H History Map Project include copy of submitted form in folder or notebook. To nominate a site for the 4-H history map please go to http://arcg.is/1bvGogV   For more information about 4-H history go to http://www.4-hhistorypreservation.com/History_Map/ For a step by step video on nominating a point, please go to this link:  http://tinyurl.com/nominate4h. Write a brief description of historical significance of 4-H place or person. (a minimum of one paragraph) 

CAREERS

  • Class H880010. Careers Interview (SF239) – Interview someone who is working in a Geospatial field and include research that career. Interviews can either be written or in a multimedia format (CD/DVD). Written interviews should be in a notebook. Written reports should be 3 to 5 pages, double spaced, 12-point font, and 1” margins. Multimedia reports should be between 3 to 5 minutes in length.

DIVISION 900 - POWER OF WIND

  • Class H900001. Engineering Notebook (SF305) – Your engineering notebook may include sketches of designs, notes of engineering questions you have, or answers to questions posed within the project manual, pictures as you complete exercises within this project, or big ideas you have while participating in this project. The notebook submitted in this class should be a working engineering notebook, not a scrapbook. Please include your name, county, and age on the front cover.
  • Class H900002. Wind Poster (SF307) – Poster should exemplify one of the lessons learned in the Power of Wind project. Posters can be any size up to 14" by 22".
  • Class H900003. Mini Turbine Blade Energy Display (SF306) – Develop a pinwheel display that demonstrates the working power of wind. Follow guidelines on page 18 and 19 of your manual. Display should include a notebook description of the effectiveness of at least three different designs or materials. Please do not include pennies with your display.
  • Class H900004. Wind Art or Literature Written Piece (SF304) – Item should illustrate or represent wind turbines, wind power, or something from the power of wind curriculum, for example a pinwheel or item may be original story or poem written by the exhibitor about wind.
  • Class H900005. Wind as Energy Display (SF308) – Item should be the original design of the 4-Her. Include the item, or a picture if item is in excess of 6’ tall or 2’ X 2’. Include a notebook of why the item was designed and how it harnesses the power of wind.
  • Class H90006. Alternative Energy (SF239) –Poster should exemplify an alternative energy source besides wind.  Posters can be any size up to 14” by 22”.

DIVISION 911 - WOODWORKING

The ability to build objects as designed by another person is an important life skill. Professional woodworkers often are hired to build objects to exacting specifications as laid out in a written plan. Requirements: All articles exhibited must include a plan (with drawings or sketch or blueprints) stating dimensions and other critical instructions a builder would need to know how to build the project. Plans may include narrative instructions in addition to the dimension drawings and include any alternations to the original plan. Part of the score depends on how well the project matches the plans. If the plans are modified, the changes from the original need to be noted on the plans. All plans used for making the article must be securely attached and protected by a clear plastic cover.

4-H’ers must be in Unit 3 or Unit 4 for the exhibit to be considered for State Fair.

NAILING IT TOGETHER – UNIT 3

  • Class H911001. Woodworking Article (SF91) - Item made using skills learned in the Nailing It Together manual. Examples include: bookcase, coffee table or end table.
  • Class H911002. Woodworking Display (SF91) - Display exemplifying one of the principles learned in the Nailing It Together Project. Examples include: measuring angles, wood lamination and joint types.
  • Class H911003. Recycled Woodworking Display (SF91) – Article made from recycled, reclaimed or composite wood. Article must be sanded and sealed and utilize one or more woodworking techniques from page 2 of the Unit 3 manual. Exhibit must include the woodworking plan and a minimum one-page report of how the engineering design process was used to develop the woodworking plan. Engineering Design Process
    1. State the problem (Why did you need this item?)
    2. Generate possible solutions (How have others solved the problem? What other alternatives or designs were considered?) _
    3. Select a solution (How does your solution compare on the basis of cost, availability, and functionality?)
    4. Build the item (What was your woodworking plan, and what processes did you use to build your item?)
    5. Evaluate (How does your item solve the original need?)
    6. Present results (How would you do this better next time?)

FINISHING UP – UNIT 4

  • Class H911004. Woodworking Article (SF91) - Item made using skills learned in the Finishing It Up Project. Examples include: dovetailing, making a pen using lathe, overlays, using a router, etc.
  • Class H911005. Woodworking Display (SF91) - Display exemplifying one of the principles learned in the Finishing It Up Project. Examples include: career opportunities, types of finishes, or dovetailing.
  • Class H911006. Recycled Woodworking Display (SF91) – Article made from recycled, reclaimed or composite wood. Article must be sanded and sealed and utilize one or more woodworking techniques from page 2 of the Unit 4 manual. Exhibit must include the woodworking plan and a minimum one-page report of how the design and engineering process was used to develop the woodworking plan.
    1. State the problem (Why did you need this item?)
    2. Generate possible solutions (How have others solved the problem? What other alternatives or designs were considered?)
    3. Select a solution (How does your solution compare on the basis of cost, availability, and functionality?)
    4. Build the item (What was your woodworking plan, and what processes did you use to build your item?)
    5. Evaluate (How does your item solve the original need?)
    6. Present results (How would you do this better next time?)

CAREERS

  • Class H911010. Careers Interview (SF239) – Interview someone who is working in the field of woodworking and research that career. Interviews can either be written or in a multimedia format (CD/DVD). Written interviews should be in a notebook. Written reports should be 3 to 5 pages, double spaced, 12-point font, and 1” margins. Multimedia reports should be between 3 to 5 minutes in length.

DIVISION 920 - WELDING

(All metal welding processes accepted.)

ARCS AND SPARKS

All welds exhibited in class 1 or 2 must be mounted on a 12" high x 15" long display board of thickness not to exceed 3/8". Attach each weld on a wire loop hinge or equivalent, so the judge can look at the bottom side of the weld when necessary. Each weld should be labeled with information stated 1) type of welding process (stick, MIG, TIG, Oxy-Acetylene, etc.) 2) kind of weld, 3) welder setting, 4) electrode/wire/rod size, and 5) electrode/wire/rod ID numbers. Attach a wire to display board so it can be hung like a picture frame.  If no plans are included with welding article or welding furniture, item will be disqualified.

4-H Welding Project Tips and Suggestions: Class 1

  1. All welds should be made with the same electrode/wire/rod size and number.
  2. Welds should be made only on one side of metal so penetration can be judged.
  3. Welds should be cleaned with chipping hammer and wire brush. Apply a coat of light oil (penetrating oil) to the metal to prevent rusting. Wipe off excess oil.
  4. It is suggested that all welds be on the same size and thickness of metal. These pieces, referred to as coupons, should be 1.5 to 2 inches wide and 3.5 to 4 inches long. A good way to get this size is to buy new cold rolled strap iron and cut to length. The extra width is needed to provide enough metal to absorb the heat from the welding process and prevent the coupons from becoming too hot before the bead is completed. Narrower coupons will become very hot, making an average welder setting too cold at the bead start, just about right in the middle, and too hot at the end. The correct way to weld narrow strips is to make short beads and allow time to cool, however this project requires a full length bead.
    • Stick welding: Suggested coupon thickness - 1/4” if using 1/8” rod. Suggested rod-AC and DC straight or reverse polarity- first E-7014, second E-6013
    • MIG welding: Suggested coupon thickness - 1/4" if using .035 wire and 1/8" if using .023 wire
    • Oxy-Acetylene: Suggested coupon thickness - 1/8". Suggested rod– 1/8" mild steel rod

4-H Welding Project Tips and Suggestions: Class 2

  1. It is suggested that all welds be on same size and thickness of metal. These pieces are referred to as coupons. The welds can be on one coupon that is about 4” x 4” or on individual coupons that are about 2" x 4" inch and ¼” thick. Suggested rods for this class of position welds for AC and DC straight or reverse polarity is, first E-6013, second E-7014 and E-6010 for DC reverse polarity only.
  2. Welds should be cleaned with a chipping hammer and wire brush. Apply a coat of light oil (penetrating oil) to the metal to prevent rusting. Wipe off excess oil.

4-H Welding Project Tips and Suggestions: Class 3 & 4

  1. All welds should be cleaned and protected from rust with paint or light oil. Plans are to be complete enough that if they were given to a welding shop, the item could be made without further instructions. Bill of materials should include a cost for all items used including steel, electrodes, paint, wheels, etc.

  • Class H92001 Welding Joints (SF281) - a display of one butt, one lap and one fillet weld. 
  • Class H92002 Position welds (SF281) - a display showing three beads welded in the vertical down, horizontal and overhead positions.
  • Class H92003 Welding article (SF281) - any shop article where welding is used in the construction. 60% of item must be completed by 4-Her and notes regarding laser welding or machine welding must be included.  All plans, plan alternations, and a bill for materials must be attached to the article. Protect plans with a cover.
  • Class H92004 Welding furniture (SF282) – any furniture with 75% welding is used in the construction.  60% of item must be completed by 4-Her and notes regarding laser welding or machine welding must be included.  All plans, plan alternations, dimensions and a bill for materials must be attached to the article.  Protect plans with a cover.  May be displayed outside.
  • Class H92005. Careers Interview (SF239) – Interview someone who is working in the field of welding and research that career. Interviews can either be written or in a multimedia format (CD/DVD). Written interviews should be in a notebook. Written reports should be 3 to 5 pages, double spaced, 12-point font, and 1” margins. Multimedia reports should be between 3 to 5 minutes in length.