Woodworking

Important Alert!

This page may contain outdated information, rules, and guidelines. We are working on updating the entire Fairbook for 2019. Please check back later for the most current information.

Co Superintendent - Lee Sherry, Madison
Co Superintendent - Amy Timmerman, Holt
Co Superintendent - Julie Kreikemeier, Colfax

Rules

  1. The name and county of each exhibitor should appear separately on the back of each board, poster or article and on the front cover of the notebooks so owner of the exhibit may be identified if the entry tag is separated from the exhibit.
  2. Each individual is limited to one woodworking exhibit per class. All static exhibits must have received a purple ribbon at the county fair to advance to the State Fair.
  3. Several classes require a display board which should be a height of 24 inches and not to exceed 1/4-inch thickness. A height of 24 7/8 inches is acceptable to allow for the saw kerf (width) if two 24 inch boards are cut from one end of a 4 foot by 8-foot sheet of plywood. Nothing should be mounted within 3/4 inch of the top or bottom of the board. (Example: Woodworking & Electricity.)
  4. Fabricated board such as plywood, composition board, or particle-type lumber may be used for demonstration displays.
  5. Demonstration boards should be sanded and finished to improve their appearance. The finish on a demonstration board will be judged as a woodworking exhibit.
  6. Demonstration boards should include an overall title for the display, plus other necessary labeling.
  7.  Reports should be written using the scientific method whenever possible (Background, the Question or hypothesis, what you plan to do and what you did, Method used and observations, Results: what you learned.  All reports should be computer generated and enclosed in a clear plastic cover. The reports should be attached securely to the display. 
  8. Reports should be written using the scientific method whenever possible (Background, the Question or hypothesis, what you plan to do and what you did, Method used and observations. Results: What you learned. All reports should be computer generated and enclosed in a clear, plastic cover. The reports should be attached securely to the display.
  9. Premier 4-H Science Award is available in this area. Please see General Rules for more details.

The ability to build objects as designed by another person is an important life skill. Professional woodworkers often are hired to build objects to exacting specifications as laid out in a written plan. Requirements: All articles exhibited must include a plan (with drawings or sketch or blueprints) stating dimensions and other critical instructions a builder would need to know how to build the project. Plans may include narrative instructions in addition to the dimension drawings and include any alternations to the original plan. Part of the score depends on how well the project matches the plans. If the plans are modified, the changes from the original need to be noted on the plans. All plans used for making the article must be securely attached and protected by a clear plastic cover.

4-H’ers must be in Unit 3 or Unit 4 for the exhibit to be considered for State Fair. All projects must have appropriate finish. If the project (i.e. picnic tables, wishing wells, swings, chairs, bridges, doghouses, etc.) is designed to be used outdoors, it will be displayed outside. 

Only one exhibit allowed per 4-H member per class.

Classes

NAILING IT TOGETHER – UNIT 3

  • Class H911001. Woodworking Article (SF91) - Item should be made using either joints, hinges, dowels, or a dado joinging made using skills learned in the Nailing It Together manual. Item is required to be appropriately finished. Examples include: bookcase, coffee table or end table.
  • Class H911002. Woodworking Display (SF91) - Display exemplifying one of the principles learned in the Nailing It Together Project. Examples include: measuring angles, wood lamination and joint types.
  • Class H911003. Recycled Woodworking Display (SF91) – Article made from recycled, reclaimed or composite wood. Article must be appropriately finished and/or sealed and utilize one or more woodworking techniques from page 2 of the Unit 3 manual. Exhibit must include the woodworking plan and a minimum one-page report of how the engineering design process was used to develop the woodworking plan. Engineering Design Process
    1. State the problem (Why did you need this item?)
    2. Generate possible solutions (How have others solved the problem? What other alternatives or designs were considered?) 
    3. Select a solution (How does your solution compare on the basis of cost, availability, and functionality?)
    4. Build the item (What was your woodworking plan, and what processes did you use to build your item?)
    5. Reason for article finish (What type of finish, how did you finish or why you chose this finish?)
    6. Evaluate (How does your item solve the original need?)
    7. Present results (How would you do this better next time?)

FINISHING UP – UNIT 4

  • Class H911004. Woodworking Article (SF91) - Item made using skills learned in the Finishing It Up Project. Examples include: dovetailing, making a pen using lathe, overlays, using a router, etc. Item is required to be appropriately finished.
  • Class H911005. Woodworking Display (SF91) - Display exemplifying one of the principles learned in the Finishing It Up Project. Examples include: career opportunities, types of finishes, or dovetailing.
  • Class H911006. Recycled Woodworking Display (SF91) – Article made from recycled, reclaimed or composite wood. Article must be appropriately finished and/or sealed and utilize one or more woodworking techniques from page 2 of the Unit 4 manual. Exhibit must include the woodworking plan and a minimum one-page report of how the design and engineering process was used to develop the woodworking plan.
    1. State the problem (Why did you need this item?)
    2. Generate possible solutions (How have others solved the problem? What other alternatives or designs were considered?)
    3. Select a solution (How does your solution compare on the basis of cost, availability, and functionality?)
    4. Build the item (What was your woodworking plan, and what processes did you use to build your item?)
    5. Reason for article finish (What type of finish, how did you finish, or why you chose this finish?)
    6. Evaluate (How does your item solve the original need?)
    7. Present results (How would you do this better next time?)

CAREERS

  • Class H911010. Careers Interview (SF239) – Interview someone who is working in the field of woodworking and research that career. Interviews can either be written or in a multimedia format (CD/DVD). Written interviews should be in a notebook. Written reports should be 3 to 5 pages, double spaced, 12-point font, and 1” margins. Multimedia reports should be between 3 to 5 minutes in length.

Scoresheets, Forms & More